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Computer Interview Questions Answers

C Interview Questions Answers

Question - 91 : - Which bit wise operator is suitable for turning off a particular bit in a number?

Answer - 91 : - The bitwise AND operator, again. In the following code snippet, the bit number 24 is reset to zero. some_int = some_int & ~KBit24;

Question - 92 : - What is storage class and what are storage variable ?

Answer - 92 : - A storage class is an attribute that changes the behavior of a variable. It controls the lifetime, scope and linkage. There are five types of storage classes 1) auto 2) static 3) extern 4) register 5) typedef

Question - 93 : - What is the difference between NULL and NUL?

Answer - 93 : - NULL is a macro defined in for the null pointer. NUL is the name of the first character in the ASCII character set. It corresponds to a zero value. There’s no standard macro NUL in C, but some people like to define it. The digit 0 corresponds to a value of 80, decimal. Don’t confuse the digit 0 with the value of ‘’ (NUL)! NULL can be defined as ((void*)0), NUL as ‘’.

Question - 94 : - The following variable is available in file1.c, who can access it?: static int average;

Answer - 94 : - all the functions in the file1.c can access the variable.

Question - 95 : - What is a null pointer assignment error? What are bus errors, memory faults, and core dumps?

Answer - 95 : - These are all serious errors, symptoms of a wild pointer or subscript. Null pointer assignment is a message you might get when an MS-DOS program finishes executing. Some such programs can arrange for a small amount of memory to be available “where the NULL pointer points to (so to speak). If the program tries to write to that area, it will overwrite the data put there by the compiler. When the program is done, code generated by the compiler examines that area. If that data has been changed, the compiler-generated code complains with null pointer assignment. This message carries only enough information to get you worried. There’s no way to tell, just from a null pointer assignment message, what part of your program is responsible for the error. Some debuggers, and some compilers, can give you more help in finding the problem. Bus error: core dumped and Memory fault: core dumped are messages you might see from a program running under UNIX. They’re more programmer friendly. Both mean that a pointer or an array subscript was wildly out of bounds. You can get these messages on a read or on a write. They aren’t restricted to null pointer problems. The core dumped part of the message is telling you about a file, called core, that has just been written in your current directory. This is a dump of everything on the stack and in the heap at the time the program was running. With the help of a debugger, you can use the core dump to find where the bad pointer was used. That might not tell you why the pointer was bad, but it’s a step in the right direction. If you don’t have write permission in the current directory, you won’t get a core file, or the core dumped message

Question - 96 : - What is Preprocessor?

Answer - 96 : - The preprocessor is used to modify your program according to the preprocessor directives in your source code. Preprocessor directives (such as #define) give the preprocessor specific instructions on how to modify your source code. The preprocessor reads in all of your include files and the source code you are compiling and creates a preprocessed version of your source code. This preprocessed version has all of its macros and constant symbols replaced by their corresponding code and value assignments. If your source code contains any conditional preprocessor directives (such as #if), the preprocessor evaluates the condition and modifies your source code accordingly. The preprocessor contains many features that are powerful to use, such as creating macros, performing conditional compilation, inserting predefined environment variables into your code, and turning compiler features on and off. For the professional programmer, in-depth knowledge of the features of the preprocessor can be one of the keys to creating fast, efficient programs.

Question - 97 : - What is the difference between text and binary modes?

Answer - 97 : - Streams can be classified into two types: text streams and binary streams. Text streams are interpreted, with a maximum length of 255 characters. With text streams, carriage return/line feed combinations are translated to the newline n character and vice versa. Binary streams are uninterpreted and are treated one byte at a time with no translation of characters. Typically, a text stream would be used for reading and writing standard text files, printing output to the screen or printer, or receiving input from the keyboard. A binary text stream would typically be used for reading and writing binary files such as graphics or word processing documents, reading mouse input, or reading and writing to the modem.

Question - 98 : - What is the stack?

Answer - 98 : - The stack is where all the functions’ local (auto) variables are created. The stack also contains some information used to call and return from functions. A stack trace is a list of which functions have been called, based on this information. When you start using a debugger, one of the first things you should learn is how to get a stack trace. The stack is very inflexible about allocating memory; everything must be deallocated in exactly the reverse order it was allocated in. For implementing function calls, that is all that’s needed. Allocating memory off the stack is extremely efficient. One of the reasons C compilers generate such good code is their heavy use of a simple stack. There used to be a C function that any programmer could use for allocating memory off the stack. The memory was automatically deallocated when the calling function returned. This was a dangerous function to call; it’s not available anymore.

Question - 99 : - Can math operations be performed on a void pointer?

Answer - 99 : - No. Pointer addition and subtraction are based on advancing the pointer by a number of elements. By definition, if you have a void pointer, you don’t know what it’s pointing to, so you don’t know the size of what it’s pointing to. If you want pointer arithmetic to work on raw addresses, use character pointers.

Question - 100 : - Write down the equivalent pointer expression for referring the same element a[i][j][k][l]?

Answer - 100 : - a[i] == *(a+i) a[i][j] == *(*(a+i)+j) a[i][j][k] == *(*(*(a+i)+j)+k) a[i][j][k][l] == *(*(*(*(a+i)+j)+k)+l)

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