• +91 9971497814
  • info@interviewmaterial.com

Ajax Interview Questions Answers

Ajax Interview Questions Answers

Question - 1 : - Does Java have support for Comet style server-side push?

Answer - 1 : - Current AJAX applications use polling to communicate changes data between the server and client. Some applications, such as chat applications, stock tickers, or score boards require more immediate notifications of updates to the client. Comet is an event based low latency server side push for AJAX applications. Comet communication keeps one of the two connections available to the browser open to continously communicate events from the server to the client. A Java based solution for Comet is being developed for Glassfish on top of the Grizzly HTTP connector. See Enabling Grizzly by Jean-Francois Arcand for more details.

Question - 2 : - Is the XMLHttpRequest object part of a W3C standard?

Answer - 2 : - No. Or not yet. It is part of the DOM Level 3 Load and Save Specification proposal.

Question - 3 : - How Ajax is Different ?

Answer - 3 : - An Ajax application eliminates the start-stop-start-stop nature of interaction on the Web by introducing an intermediary — an Ajax engine — between the user and the server. It seems like adding a layer to the application would make it less responsive, but the opposite is true. Instead of loading a webpage, at the start of the session, the browser loads an Ajax engine — written in JavaScript and usually tucked away in a hidden frame. This engine is responsible for both rendering the interface the user sees and communicating with the server on the user’s behalf. The Ajax engine allows the user’s interaction with the application to happen asynchronously — independent of communication with the server. So the user is never staring at a blank browser window and an hourglass icon, waiting around for the server to do something.   Figure 2: The synchronous interaction pattern of a traditional web application (top) compared with the asynchronous pattern of an Ajax application (bottom). Every user action that normally would generate an HTTP request takes the form of a JavaScript call to the Ajax engine instead. Any response to a user action that doesn’t require a trip back to the server — such as simple data validation, editing data in memory, and even some navigation — the engine handles on its own. If the engine needs something from the server in order to respond — if it’s submitting data for processing, loading additional interface code, or retrieving new data — the engine makes those requests asynchronously, usually using XML, without stalling a user’s interaction with the application.

Question - 4 : - Is the server or the client in control?

Answer - 4 : - It depends. With AJAX the answer is more in between. Control can be more centralized in a server-side component or as a mix of client-side and server-side controllers. * Centralized server-side controller - When having a more centralized controller the key is to make sure the data in client-side page is in sync with that of the server. Some applications may keep all the state on the server and push all updates to client DOM via a simple JavaScript controller. * Client and server-side controllers - This architecture would use JavaScript to do all presentation related control, event processing, page manipulation, and rendering of model data on the client. The server-side would be responsible for things such as business logic and pushing updated model data to the client. In this case the server would not have intimate knowledge of the presentation short of the initial page that would be sent to the client page request. There are some use cases where an entire AJAX application can be written in a single page. Keep in mind if you choose this type of architecture that navigation and bookmarking should be considered. Both methods are viable depending on what you are trying to accomplish. I tend to prefer spreading the control across the client and server.

Question - 5 : - Does AJAX work with Java?

Answer - 5 : - Absolutely. Java is a great fit for AJAX! You can use Java Enterprise Edition servers to generate AJAX client pages and to serve incoming AJAX requests, manage server side state for AJAX clients, and connect AJAX clients to your enterprise resources. The JavaServer Faces component model is a great fit for defining and using AJAX components.

Question - 6 : - What is the minimum version of PHP that needs to be running in order to use HTML_AJAX?

Answer - 6 : - The oldest PHP version i've fully tested HTML_AJAX is 4.3.11, but it should run on 4.2.0 without any problems. (Testing reports from PHP versions older then 4.3.11 would be appreciated.)

Question - 7 : - Do I really need to learn JavaScript?

Answer - 7 : - Basically yes if you plan to develop new AJAX functionality for your web application. On the other hand, JSF components and component libraries can abstract the details of JavaScript, DOM and CSS. These components can generate the necessary artifacts to make AJAX interactions possible. Visual tools such as Java Studio Creator may also use AJAX enabled JSF components to create applications, shielding the tool developer from many of the details of  AJAX. If you plan to develop your own JSF components or wire the events of components together in a tool it is important that you have a basic understanding of JavaScript. There are client-side JavaScript libraries (discussed below) that you can call from your in page JavaScript that abstract browser differences. Object Hierarchy and Inheritance in JavaScript is a great resource for a Java developer to learn about JavaScript objects.

Question - 8 : - How do I debug JavaScript?

Answer - 8 : - There are not that many tools out there that will support both client-side and server-side debugging. I am certain this will change as AJAX applications proliferate. I currently do my client-side and server-side debugging separately. Below is some information on the client-side debuggers on some of the commonly used browsers. * Firefox/Mozilla/Netscape - Have a built in debugger Venkman which can be helpful but there is a Firefox add on known as FireBug which provides all the information and AJAX developer would ever need including the ability to inspect the browser DOM, console access to the JavaScript runtime in the browser, and the ability to see the HTTP requests and responses (including those made by an XMLHttpRequest). I tend to develop my applications initially on Firefox using Firebug then venture out to the other browsers. * Safari - Has a debugger which needs to be enabled. See the Safari FAQ for details. * Internet Explorer - There is MSDN Documentation on debugging JavaScript. A developer toolbar for Internet Explorer may also be helpful. While debuggers help a common technique knowing as "Alert Debugging" may be used. In this case you place "alert()" function calls inline much like you would a System.out.println. While a little primitive it works for most basic cases. Some frameworks such as Dojo provide APIs for tracking debug statements.

Question - 9 : - How do I send an image using AJAX?

Answer - 9 : - While it may appear that images are being sent when using AJAX with an application like Google Maps what is really happening is that the URLs of images are being send as the response of an AJAX request and those URLs are being set using DHTML. In this example an XML document is returned from an AJAX interaction and the category bar is populated. <categories> <category> <cat-id>1</cat-id> <name>Books</name> <description>Fun to read</description> <image-url>books_icon.gif</image-url> </category> <category> <cat-id>2</cat-id> <name>Electronics</name> <description>Must have gadgets</description> <image-url>electronics.gif</image-url> </category> </categories> Notice that the image-url element contains the location of the URL for the image representing a category. The callback method of an AJAX interaction will parse the response XML document and call the addCategory function for each category included in the response XML document. The addCategory function looks up a table row element "categoryTable" in body of the page and adds a row to the element which contains the image. <scrip type="text/javascript" > ... function addCategory(id, name, imageSrc) { var categoryTable = document.getElementById("categoryTable"); var row = document.createElement("tr"); var catCell = document.createElement("td"); var img = document.createElement("img"); img.src = ("images\\" + imageSrc); var link = document.createElement("a"); link.className ="category"; link.appendChild(document.createTextNode(name)); link.setAttribute("onclick", "catalog?command=category&catid=" + id); catCell.appendChild(img); catCell.appendChild(link); row.appendChild(catCell); categoryTable.appendChild(row); } </script> ... <table> <tr> <td width="300" bgoclor="lightGray"> <table id="categoryTable" border="0" cellpadding="0"

Question - 10 : - What exactly is the W3C DOM?

Answer - 10 : - The W3C Document Object Model (DOM) is defined by the W3C as the following: The Document Object Model is a platform- and language-neutral interface.

Ajax Contributors

krishan

Share your email for latest updates

Name:
Email:

Our partners